• What do you think draws someone's attention to a fragmentary work of art (e.g., curiosity of what is unknown, space for the imagination, a barometer of time and loss)? Get this from a library! Ovid takes stories relevant to his culture and time period, and weaves them together into one work with a connecting theme of transformation throughout. A study in the transformations of a literary symbol by Segal, Charles, 1936-Publication date 1969 Ovid states his aim for Metamorphoses in the very first line: "Of bodies changed to other forms I tell; / You Gods, who have yourselves wrought every change, / Inspire my enterprise." Display an image of Antonio Canova's Apollo Crowning Himself. • What problem sets the drama in motion? Have you ever experienced a deep and powerful reaction to something that happened all of a sudden? The popularity and timelessness of this work stems from the manner of story telling. Give students time to address their peers' feedback. • Reproduction of Apollo Crowning Himself by Antonio Canova Cupid is mischievous, and proves tricky in his ability to transform the god into a love-crazed fool. (The expression is blank, which is quite common in the stoic demeanor of ancient statuary. There are calls for Ovid's Metamorphoses to be taught with a trigger warning. 3. Display an image of Red-Figure Loutrophoros by an unknown artist and discuss which parts of the story are depicted on the vessel. A summary of Part X (Section9) in Ovid's Metamorphoses. (A speaker expresses his thoughts while experiencing a fragment of an ancient sculpture. In part two, students read an ekphrastic poem by Rainer Maria Rilke and study a related work of art. Have students write a poem that describes a transformation they've experienced. Ovid's Metamorphoses is a poem about change on every level imaginable. These themes, and others, Ovid explores throughout the Metamorphoses, doing his best to uncover every possible scenario for each trope. At the same time, however, a lead arrow struck the nymph, turning her feelings to those of revulsion.) It is written in hexameter verse. Pentheus was a skeptical man who doubted Tiresias' prophecies, so when the blind man foretold that Pentheus would disrespect the power of Bacchus as a god and be ripped apart by the hands of his own mother and sisters for his faithlessness, Pentheus didn't believe him.. 4. Discuss the story with the following prompts: Display an image of Young Man and distribute copies of a translation of the ekphrastic poem "Archaic Torso of Apollo" by Rainer Maria Rilke. 4. Was it an object, a person, or an event? The popularity and timelessness of this work stems from the manner of story telling. (What is its original context? The idea of transformation has long been a well-used theme in Western literature. Popular examples include Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando: A Biography. Lesson Overview. Inform students that marble itself was a noble material that connected the work of art to the ancient world; its pristine white surface seems to suggest divine qualities of light. Like a troublesome younger brother, an embarrassment to the family, Ovid’s epic “kicks against the pricks,” to paraphrase the paraphrase of Nick Cave. His masterpiece, Metamorphoses, has uniquely influenced art and literature across 2,000 years, ravishing the palettes of artists from Raphael and Titian through Velasquez, Rembrandt and Giordano to Tiepolo, Poussin and Moreau. Then ask for volunteers to take turns reading each paragraph aloud. • Artists can use strong light and shadow side by side to draw attention to important details in a scene. 1. Give students time to read the poem once quietly. • Encourage students to create an object for display during the performance of their poem that symbolizes the transformation they addressed in their writing. His encyclopedic poem, The Metamorphoses, follows a narrative thread from the creation of the Earth to the transformation of Caesar into a god. • Which line or description do you think is most effective? The Metamorphoses (Latin: Metamorphōseōn librī: "Books of Transformations") is an 8 AD Latin narrative poem by the Roman poet Ovid, considered his magnum opus.Comprising 11,995 lines, 15 books and over 250 myths, the poem chronicles the history of the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Caesar within a loose mythico-historical framework. 1. (The arrow transformed the usually sober character of Apollo into a lustful pursuant of the chaste nymph. • In the poem the speaker tries to describe the object that he sees. The idea of transformation has long been a well-used theme in Western literature. Students will be able to: • What do you think draws someone's attention to a fragmentary work of art (e.g., curiosity of what is unknown, space for the imagination, a barometer of time and loss)? (Wanting to teach the pompous god a lesson, the mischievous Cupid shot two arrows at the unsuspecting Apollo and the mortal Daphne. One recurring theme of Metamorphoses is that of Love. transformations in ovid’s metamorphoses [This list has been prepared by Ian Johnston, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada. Speaking and Listening Stories from ancient Greece and Rome have been interpreted and reinterpreted for centuries. Ovid completed the Metamorphoses in 8 a.d., the same year that Augustus Caesar banished him from Rome to Tomis, a city on the Black Sea coast of Rumania. That includes personal love or as the personified deity, Amor/Cupid. Inform students that marble itself was a noble material that connected the work of art to the ancient world; its pristine white surface seems to suggest divine qualities of light. Open a discussion with your students by suggesting that sculptural art often presents characters isolated from the narrative context or setting. Students will be assessed on their ability to: Some of the metamorphoses are straightforwardly literal: Diana turns Actaeon into a deer, for example, or Juno changes Callisto into a bear. on the Jacket Magazine Web site at http://jacketmagazine.com/36/beck-rilke-torso.shtml. • What is happening in the poem? A summary of Part X (Section9) in Ovid's Metamorphoses. (What is its original context? 37. Open a discussion with students about the drawing, using the following questions: 3. In Roman stories, he commonly was called Phoebus when referring to his role as the god of light. They then write an original poem that explores the theme of transformation. Next, ask them if they have a favorite story that was made into a movie. Grades 9–12 Inform students that the god Apollo was called by different names, depending on which role or duty he was fulfilling in a story. Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Inform your students that the poem was translated from German. • How did Daphne escape his pursuit? 4. The title of the poem means 'transformation', and this is a major theme throughout the work. • Which parts of the poem would benefit from further explanation or detail? Will you include a message or call to action like in Rilke's poem? A study in the transformations of a literary symbol Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item. 5. Reading: Literature Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. R.CCR.10. Who made it? (The arrow transformed the usually sober character of Apollo into a lustful pursuant of the chaste nymph. The Theme Of Transformation In The Silence Of The Lambs And Lamia 810 Words | 4 Pages. Inform your students that the poem was translated from German. It is usually the cause of whatever transformation the stories are explaining. 1. • What motivates each of the main characters? The popularity and timelessness of this work stems from the manner of story telling. Have students consider the following: Then ask for volunteers to read their completed poems aloud to the class. • What motivates each of the main characters? • Which line or description do you think is most effective? Who made it? It is usually the cause of whatever transformation the stories are explaining. Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. Where can you find examples of figurative language in the poem? That includes personal love or as the personified deity, Amor/Cupid. 7. Display an image of Young Man and distribute copies of a translation of the ekphrastic poem "Archaic Torso of Apollo" by Rainer Maria Rilke. His lovelorn attempts include listing his admirable qualities, including his divine strengths and heritage.) Subjects: Visual Arts, English–Language Arts Daphne, already known for her chastity, becomes all the more revolted by the lust directed at her.) The gods are always avenging themselves and changing mortals into animals or plants so that they can prove their own superiority. Three to four 50-minute class periods Display a reproduction of Jan Boeckhorst's drawing Apollo and Daphne. The Saylor Foundation 1 Guide to Responding Study Guide for Ovid’s Metamorphoses Main Point Summary/Background: Metamorphoses is more than a collection of stories of mythical adventures, it is a meditation on the theme of metamorphosis or transformation in all its myriad forms. Share with students that artists often interpret stories from the past in original works of art. As noted, this love does not always have a positive result; in fact, often the case is quite the opposite. Distribute copies of "Daphne and Phoebus" to your students. • interpret and compare literary and visual works of art. Compare and contrast how Apollo is presented differently in the various texts and images. Read the original German text in the article "And Yet Another Archaic Torso—Why?" It does not include the changes which occur when gods disguise themselves as human individuals or as animals or temporarily alter their shape. R.CCR.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. • Which parts of the poem would benefit from further explanation or detail? What was its function? Part One: Apollo and Daphne In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. • Inform students that many objects from the ancient world are fragmentary due to the ravages of time, the elements, and human intervention. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Metamorphoses and what it means. • Copies of the poem "Archaic Torso of Apollo," by Rainer Maria Rilke, translated by Stephen Mitchell (available on the Academy of American Poets Web site at Reading: Literature • What inspired your transformation? RL.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Ovid takes stories relevant to his culture and time period, and weaves them together into one work with a connecting theme of transformation throughout. Ask students if they can think of a film that is inspired by Greek or Roman mythology. Extension • Reproduction of Apollo Crowning Himself by Antonio Canova Nestor then tells the story of the Centauromachy, which was fought at the wedding of the Lapith king Perithous (Peirithoos) and Hippodameia after the Centaurs, unused to alcohol, became intoxicated and tried to abduct the bride -- abduction being a common theme in Metamorphoses, as well. • Connect to biological science by exploring examples of transformation that occur in nature (e.g., butterflies). Part Two: Ekphrasis and Rilke's Poetry • Consider the sculpture you saw before (Antonio Canova's Apollo Crowning Himself). Theme of Revenge in Metamorphoses Revenge is a recurring theme in the book Metamorphoses. 1. • What is Apollo's solution to his loss of love? • Diagonal lines suggest movement and drama. 6. The tile of Ovid’s poem Metamorphoses literally translates to mean “transformation.” The compendium is actually itself a transformational work, merging a multitude of Greek and Roman historical traditions into one massive epic poem. The gods often make themselves look like humans so they can visit Earth and interact incognito with people. The Homeric Iliad (c. 850 BC) soars to the literary heights of the sublime, and shows us how to live and die, to meditate on mortality, to embrace sorrow, to grip and then release hate, to truly love. • If you were to compliment the artist for this drawing, what would you say he does well? Ultimately, she is transformed into a laurel tree.) Reading: Literature In addition to the idea of divine retribution, Ovid also plays with the theme of mortal daring, for it is by vexing Juno and rejecting nymphs that lead Echo and Narcissus to their respective punishments. The Metamorphoses continues to be retold through several media – in film, drama, opera, art, sculpture and so on. Common Core Standards for English Language Arts The emotion seemingly turns inward—stoic and reserved—rather than manifesting itself in an outward expression of loss.) Many of the tales told by Ovid interact with the theme of impossible love—but especially the story of … (She prays to her father, a river god, that her purity remain intact and that her beauty be destroyed. 3. Ovid declares right at the beginning what his book is going to be about. Ovid takes stories relevant to his culture and time period, and weaves them together into one work with a connecting theme of transformation throughout. • Reproduction of Apollo and Daphne by Jan Boeckhorst In the Metamorphoses Ovid retells stories from the Greek myths, arranging them in roughly chronological order, from the origins of the world to his own times. The Metamorphoses is a collection of tales rather than one complex story or set of adventures. Grades 9–10 What questions might a scholar want to ask if he or she discovered a fragment?

theme of transformation in ovid's metamorphoses

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